It’s a bold move. To descend from the heights of the virtuoso Romantic piano repertoire – Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov et al – to lavish Petzold’s Minuet in G major with just as much seriousness and affection. To be fair, young Russian pianist and composer Daniil Trifonov’s latest recording The Art of Life includes, as its centrepiece, one of the most intellectually complex and challenging works a pianist can assay: JS Bach’s The Art of Fugue .

Daniil Trifonov

But how miraculous, yet how natural, how inevitable, to make those preceding selections from Anna Magdalena’s Notebook sound like Schumann’s Scenes from Childhood . And to precede those with the music, clothed in such variegated styles yet demonstrating the apple never falls far from the tree, of four of Bach’s sons, with works of varying styles and moods. And then, to bookend The Art of Fugue with Brahms’s arrangement for piano left hand of Bach’s magnificent Chaconne from the Violin...